Human Interaction Lab



Communication requires dialogue partners to produce and perceive speech, and to coordinate these behaviors to succeed. What happens when the ability to produce or perceive speech is impaired? And how does this disrupt the natural process of conversation. In this lab, we explore how speech disorders (e.g., dysarthria) interfere with speech production, speech perception, and conversational entrainment (interpersonal coordination). We consider breakdowns in human interaction as an entity of the dialogue pair and investigate novel approaches to identify and rehabilitate such deficits. This work emphasizes the role of rhythm in communication and draws from a breadth of disciplines including speech science, cognitive science, psychology, sociolinguistics, and tools from the field of engineering. Work in the Human Interaction Lab is currently funded by the National Institute of Health.


Stephanie A Borrie, Ph.D.
Lab Director

Stephanie A. Borrie, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Director, Human Interaction Lab
Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education
Utah State University

Dr. Borrie talking with ASHA about her work on conversational entrainment after receiving the Editors’ Award [Speech] from the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research for her article, “Rhythm as a coordinating device: Entrainment with disordered speech.”

Publications

Refereed Journal Publications

Borrie, S.A. and Schäfer, M.C.M. (in press). Effects of lexical and somatosensory feedback on long-term improvements in intelligibility of dysarthric speech. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research.

Borrie, S.A. and Delfino, C. (2017). Conversational entrainment of vocal fry in young adult female American English speakers. Journal of Voice. [Epub ahead of print]

Muñoz, K., Ong, C., Borrie, S.A., Nelson, L.H., and Twohig, M. (2017). Audiologists’ communication behavior during hearing device management appointments. International Journal of Audiology. [Epub ahead of print]

Borrie, S.A., Lansford, K.L. and Barrett, T.S. (2017). Rhythm perception and its role in recognition and learning of dysrhythmic speech. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 60, 561–570.

Bent, T., Baese-Berk, M., Borrie, S.A., and McKee, M. (2016). Individual differences in the perception of unfamiliar regional, nonnative, and disordered speech varieties. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 140, 3775-3786.

Lansford, K.L., Borrie, S.A., and Bystricky, L. (2016). Use of crowdsourcing to assess the ecological validity of perceptual training paradigms in dysarthria. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 25, 233-239.

Borrie, S.A. and Schäfer, M.C.M. (2015). The role of somatosensory information in speech perception: Imitation improves recognition of disordered speech. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 58, 1708–1716.

Borrie, S.A., Lubold, N. and Pon-Barry, H. (2015). Disordered speech disrupts conversational entrainment: A study of acoustic-prosodic entrainment and communicative success in populations with communication challenges. Frontiers in Psychology, 6:1187.

Borrie, S.A. (2015). Visual information: A help or hindrance to perceptual processing of dysarthric speech. Journal of Acoustical Society of America, 137, 1473-1480.

Borrie, S.A. and Liss, J.M., (2014). Rhythm as a coordinating device: Entrainment with disordered speech. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 57, 815-824.

Borrie, S.A., McAuliffe, M.J., Liss, J.M., O’Beirne, G.A., and Anderson, T. (2013). The role of linguistic and indexical information in improved recognition of dysarthric speech. Journal of Acoustical Society of America, 133, 474-482.

Borrie, S.A., McAuliffe, M.J., Liss, J.M., Kirk, C., O'Beirne, G.A., and Anderson, T. (2012). Familiarisation conditions and the mechanisms that underlie improved recognition of dysarthric speech. Language and Cognitive Processes, 27, 1039-1055.

Borrie, S.A., McAuliffe, M.J., Liss, J.M., O'Beirne, G.A., and Anderson, T. (2012). A follow-up investigation into the mechanisms that underlie improved recognition of dysarthric speech. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 132, EL102-108.

Borrie, S.A., McAuliffe, M.J., and Liss, J.M. (2012). Perceptual learning of dysarthric speech: A review of experimental studies. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 55, 290-305.

McAuliffe, M.J., Borrie, S.A., Good, P.V., and Hughes, L.E. (2010). Consideration of the listener in the assessment and treatment of dysarthria. ACQuiring Knowledge in Speech, Language, and Hearing, 12, 16-19.

Borrie, S.A., McAuliffe, M.J., Tillard, G., Ormond, T., Anderson, T., and Hornibrook, J. (2007). Effect of the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT®) on articulation in speakers with Parkinson’s disease. New Zealand Journal of Speech-Language Therapy, 62, 29-36.

Refereed Conference Presentations
Borrie, S.A. and Lansford, K.L. (2016). Locus of learning in musicians and non-musicians following familiarization with dysarthric speech. Psychonomic Society, Boston, Massachusetts: November 17-20.

Wynn, C.J. and Borrie, S.A. (2016). Speech rate entrainment in children and adults with autism spectrum disorder. American Speech, Language and Hearing Association Convention, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: November 17-19.

Borrie, S.A. (Invited Speaker) and Lansford, K.L. (2016). The role of rhythm perception in recognition and learning of disordered speech. 171st Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, Salt Lake City, Utah: May 23-27.

Baese-Berk, M., Bent, T., Borrie, S.A., and McKee, M. (2016). Individual differences in perception of unfamiliar speech. Second Northwest Phonetics and Phonology Conference, Eugene, Oregon: May 15.

Borrie, S.A. and Schäfer, M.C.M. (2016). Imitation improves recognition of disordered speech. Eighteenth Biennial Conference on Motor Speech Disorders: Motor Speech Disorders and Speech Motor Control, Newport Beach, California: March 3-6.

Borrie, S.A., Lubold, N., and Pon-Barry, H. (2015). Disordered speech disrupts conversational entrainment: A study of acoustic-prosodic entrainment and communicative success in populations with communication challenges. Psychonomic Society, Chicago, Illinois. November 19-22.

Lansford, K.L., Borrie, S.A., Bystricky, L., Bates, L., Gray, D., and Suveg, J. (2015). Use of crowdsourcing to assess the ecological validity of perceptual training paradigms in dysarthria. American Speech, Language and Hearing Association Convention, Denver, Colorado. November 11-14.

Baese-Berk, M., Bent, T., Borrie, S.A., and McKee, M. (2015). Individual differences in perception of unfamiliar speech. 18 International Congress of Phonetic Science, Glasgow, Scotland, UK. August 10-14.

Borrie, S.A., Berisha, V., and Liss (2014; Select-speaker Award Recipient). Computational modeling of conversational entrainment: A novel framework for examining spoken interaction in communication disorders. Psychonomic Society, Long Beach, California. November 20-23, 2014.

Borrie, S.A., Berisha, V., and Liss (2014). Modeling spoken interaction in communication disorders. Finding Common Ground: Social, Ecological, and Cognitive Perspectives on Language Use, Stores, Connecticut: June 12-14.

Borrie, S.A., Liss, J.M, and Berisha, V. (2014). Conversational entrainment: A novel framework for modeling communication interactions in motor speech disorders. Seventeenth Biennial Conference on Motor Speech Disorders: Motor Speech Disorders and Speech Motor Control, Sarasota, Florida: February 27-March 2.

Borrie, S.A., Torres, H. and Liss, J.M. (2013). Rhythm as a coordinating device: Entrainment with dysarthric speech. Second International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, Linköping, Sweden: June 16-19.

Borrie, S.A., McAuliffe, M.J., Liss, J.M., O’Beirne, G.A., and Anderson, T. (2011). The role of linguistic and indexical information in improved recognition of dysarthric speech. 162nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, San Diego, California: October 13-November 4.

Borrie, S.A., McAuliffe, M.J., Liss, J.M., O’Beirne, G.A., and Anderson, T. (2011). Perceptual learning of hypokinetic dysarthria: A follow-up investigation into the mechanisms that underlie passive and explicit learning of dysarthric speech. Asia Pacific Conference on Speech, Language, and Hearing, Christchurch, New Zealand: January 11-14.

Broadmore, S., McAuliffe, M.J., Borrie, S.A., and O’Beirne, G.A. (2011). Influences on listener strategies in the perception of dysarthric speech. Asia Pacific Conference on Speech, Language, and Hearing, Christchurch, New Zealand: January 11-14.

Borrie, S.A., McAuliffe, M.J., Liss, J.M., Kirk, C., O’Beirne, G.A., and Anderson, T. (2010). Perceptual learning and intelligibility gains in dysarthria associated with Parkinson’s disease. Health Research Society Canterbury: Seminar Series, Christchurch, New Zealand: July 16.

Borrie, S.A., McAuliffe, M.J., Liss, J.M., Kirk, C., O’Beirne, G.A., and Anderson, T. (2010). Learning to better understand distorted speech: An investigation into perceptual learning of dysarthria. New Zealand Speech-language Therapists’ Association Biennial Conference: Practice Worth Spreading, Wellington, New Zealand: April 22-23.

Borrie, S.A., McAuliffe, M.J., Liss, J.M., Kirk, C., O’Beirne, G.A., and Anderson, T. (2010). A comparison of familiarisation modes on perceptual learning and speech intelligibility of hypokinetic dysarthria. Fifteenth Biennial Conference on Motor Speech Disorders: Motor Speech Disorders and Speech Motor Control, Savannah, Georgia: March 4-7.

McAuliffe, M.J., Borrie, S.A., Tillard, G., Anderson, T., and Hornibrook, J. (2006). The effects of the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT®) program upon articulation in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). New Zealand Speech-language Therapists’ Association Biennial Conference, Christchurch, New Zealand: April 9-12.

Our Team

Stephanie Borrie
Lab Director
I am currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education at Utah State University (USU). I hold a Ph.D. in Speech-Language Pathology from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, and spent two years as a postdoctoral fellow in the Motor Speech Disorders Lab at Arizona State University. Download CV HERE and to check out my official USU Directory page, click HERE.
Ashley Hurst
Lab Manager
Camille Wynn
M.S. Student
Michelle Parker
M.S. Student
Marissa Miller
B.S. Student
Danielle Fawcett
B.S. Student

Latest news

Participate

We are always looking for people for neurogenic speech disorders to participate in our research. If you live in the Logan area and have a speech disorder from any type of brain injury or disease then we welcome your participation.
If you're interested or have any questions please send an email to:
stephanie.borrie@usu.edu